BVS to Demo 802.11a Analysis System

By Wi-Fi Planet Staff

June 16, 2003

Berkeley Varitronics Systems plans to unveil its new Yellowjacket handheld analysis tool for 802.11a networks next week at the 802.11 Planet Conference and Expo in Boston.

Berkeley Varitronics Systems (BVS) will unveil its new Yellowjacket handheld analysis tool for 802.11a networks next week at the 802.11 Planet Conference and Expo in Boston.

Like the 802.11b system, the new Yellowjacket is designed to work with a Compaq iPaq Pocket PC. The 802.11a version uses a custom receiver and software to analyze wireless local area networks operating at 5.8GHz in order to identify potential interference problems.

The new receiver measures all 12 channels operating on the 802.11a standard to identify access points, packet error rate, multipath, SSID (service set identifier) and received signal strength (RSSI). It uses the iPaq's Windows CE operating system to filter and process DSSS studies. BVS, of Metuchen, N.J., said that the Yellowjacket is the only true RF analysis and direction finding tool that is accurate to within 1 decibel.

The Yellowjacket 802.11a analysis system works with iPaq 3800, 3900 and 5400 series devices, and takes advantage of the handheld's 64,000-color backlit display for real-time, color-coded signal analysis. The system includes the Yellowjacket Data Logger software, which displays, records and logs all WLAN data for later replay and conversion.

Craig Schober, a BVS spokesperson, said the Yellowjacket 802.11a system should be available this summer. The $3300 package includes the receiver, an iPaq 3955, 8 removable batteries, a charger, an iPaq docking/charging cradle and a carrying case. The receiver alone is $2800.

In addition to the new Yellowjacket, BVS will also be demonstrating its Bird's Eye mapping software for 802.11b networks at the show next week. Schober said version 2.0 of the software, which works with the Yellowjacket 802.11b receiver, should be available soon. The $2500 Bird's Eye software allows site surveyors to create facility floor plans and plot WLAN information on-the-fly. A version of Bird's Eye for 802.11a is in the works, Schober said.

To learn more about RF site survey equipment and techniques, check out Jim Geier's workshop at the show on Wednesday, June 25.



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